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Review: The Woman in the Window

Review: The Woman in the Window

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The Woman in the Window, A.J. Finn
Published January 2, 2018 William Morrow

Anna Fox lives alone, a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times--and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, and their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

5 Stars
This was my pick from the January selection from Book of the Month. A.J. Finn makes it abundantly clear that he's not the first person to tell this kind of story, peppering the book with references to dozens of films, including the well-known Hitchcock classics as way of making sure readers know exactly where he's paying homage. But as the book progresses, Finn makes it clear that while there are other's who have come before him, this is very much his own story.

I loved the way that Anna's history was so carefully parceled out and how it felt like I was right there with her, shut off and in her home watching old movies and slipping down an ever deeper slope of wine and meds. There were two pieces of the series of reveals that I had already puzzled out by the time they arrived. I read a lot of mysteries, maybe even too many mysteries, so often I spot the setups, but the final reveal of the book was such a doozy because of how well Dr. Anna was set up as a character.

It was also fun to revisit my former home, NYC, in such a concise way. Usually stories in New York are so sprawling because of the size and culture of the city, but this stayed so small thanks to Anna's limited world. 

Overall, a great pick for armchair sleuths and Hitchcock fans. It's enough to make me want to settle in for some Jimmy Stewart now that I've finished the book.

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